Mission Statement

Stone By Stone- building a road following God's chosen path.  Together with our brothers and sisters of Haiti, we strive to serve the cooperative of HASWEP through Listening, Educating, Supporting, Praying, Working, Advancing.

LESPWA means HOPE in Creole. 
We are full of hope for Haiti.

 

.

 FANMI LASANTE

CLINIC

Desab, Haiti

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Sunday
Oct212012

Behind the Scenes

Every succesful ministry out there would not be that way if not for the many "behind the scenes" players.  We wanted to introduce you to a few of those players who have been spending a tremendous amount of time making things for us to bring on our upcoming trip.

First meet Miss Benny & her daughter Kristen. 

They have been knitting these gorgeous blankets and caps over the last few months.  When Kristen first started the project she reached out to friends for donations of yarn.  All this beautiful yarn was donated by one friend.  What a blessing!  Although it still blows my mind, mothers in Haiti love to wrap up their newborns in blankets and caps.  Many times I have seen the babies with make shift caps on their little heads made out of a cheese cloth like material.  I can not wait to see these beautiful little knit caps that were made by two people who love their Lord and have a true heart for our mission.  THANK YOU to you both.  I know the moms in the villages will be thrilled to receive this gift.  Even better, Miss Benny, prayer warrior that she is, I am sure prayed over each little head that will wear one of these caps.  Love you both!

Also using her talents Barb Appleton, mom and mom in-law to Paul & Julie, has been spending hours in her sewing room making 75 plus sun dresses for the girls in the villages.  It started out as a way to use up some scrap fabric but quickly morphed into a labor of love.  Having used up her scraps we put the word out for fabric and the Miheli family and friends (Nicole's mom!) came in strong sending Barb a box full of fabric.  Each one she made seemed to be cuter than the last.  These dresses are not only beautiful but really practical for the climate and terrain of the villages.  It is not often that the girls get brand new clothes let alone beautifully hand-made brand new dresses.  Again, so excited to see the photos!!!  Thanks mom!

 

These are just a few of the people who support us.  On a regular basis, Elaine from church hands me a bag of needed items to take down.  Her sister showed up just this morning with a bag of onsies.  Several friends recently purchased Lia Sophia jewelry knowing the proceeds were going to Stone By Stone.  Luther Memorial Church gifted us 30 bags filled with school supplies for the children and regularly we are blessed by anonymous donations throught this site. 

THANK YOU to any and all of you who continue to stand behind this mission that is so important to all of us who serve.  Looking forward to seeing all that Gid has in store in the future. 

Sunday
May272012

Haiti Redefines...

I recently came home from my second trip to Haiti.  I really love it there.  While two trips by no means make me an expert, I have been learning a lot about Haiti, about the region in which we are staying and working, about the people.  I’ve even been learning Haitian Creole.  One of the things I am learning is that Haiti redefines many things for me. 

Haiti redefines hot.  For me there are now two temperatures – hot and Haiti hot.  Haiti hot makes you sweat like you just did Zumba, and really all you did was walk up the hill to the outhouse.  Haiti hot made me love grape Propel water. 

Haiti redefines my silly fears.  At home, I have a ridiculous and inexplicable fear of mice.  However, I know they live in, or at least frequently visit, the clinic.  As do rats.  And lizards.  It is not a critter-proof fortress.  So when I saw a mouse in one of the rooms in the clinic I made myself stare at it in hopes of getting over this dumb fear.  And it was actually pretty cute.  Our last night in Haiti, a bat flew into the clinic.  I laid my head down on the table and pretended I didn’t see it.  Don’t get me started on bats.  I also saw a rat.  Somehow I still slept that night.  God is good. 

Haiti redefines my bucket list.  What I actually find myself doing is adding things to my bucket list, then crossing them off.  I constantly do things that I never thought I wanted to do or are outside of my comfort zone and I think, “This would make a good addition to my bucket list.”  This trip that included peeing outside of the clinic at 9:00pm when I wasn’t sure if the noise in the bushes had been a goat or a person.  Also add peeing outside at night and strategically avoiding tarantulas.  The biggest bucket list addition this trip was riding in the open bed of a pick-up truck out of the village of Brely.  Imagine a road so incredibly rocky and hilly that you thought multiple times you would be tossed right out of the back of the truck.  Holding onto the truck in an effort to stay seated on the wheel well was an entire upper body workout.  I had bruises to prove it.  But I got to check it off my bucket list!

Haiti redefines joy.  This trip I found immense joy in showering in my bathing suit, along with numerous giggling children, under a rain gutter in a pouring rain.  Watching those kids strip down to their underwear, squeeze about ½ cup of Herbal Essence shampoo into their hands and lather up with so much soap they looked white, all the while laughing and dancing under the pouring water…it was a kind of fun I had never thought of having.  And I honestly don’t think my hair has ever felt that clean. 

Haiti redefines me.  It redefines what I think about, what I talk about.  It redefines how I see myself.  It redefines my relationship with God.  I feel so blessed to be a part of what He is doing in Haiti and am honored to be a part of the mission of Stone by Stone.  And thankful to everyone for their support as we head down this new road.  Mesi zanmi!  (Thank you friends!)

Thursday
May172012

Tout bagay byen avek Jezi (Baby Ivnalie)

 

(For those of you that follow us on our family blog, sorry for the repeat just really felt like it was worth sharing again!)

This is Ivnaline. She is 3 months old from GalGal, Haiti.  Her mother brought her to the clinic on Wednesday. She was a really sick baby. Fever of 102, diarrhea, labored breathing, not nursing, sick! Nicole treated him the best she could with what we had and asked the mom to bring him back in Friday morning. Thankfully she did because he was worse. I have never seen eyes like hers. It was frightening. The decision was made to bring her to Mission Hope in Cabaret. I was blessed to be able to go with Ivnaline and mom. Of course they would have had to pry that baby out of my arms otherwise but fortunately that was unnecessary.

So we are on the way down the mountain. I have a baby in my arms with a look and feel and presence that I never want to see again.  (After the fact, Nicole put him at 48 hours from dying without treatment).  There is a point along the road where a path goes off to the right towards the village of Dotel.  We make an unexpected stop here to talk to an older man who is sitting under a tree.  My thoughts at this point go something like " Are you out of your mind this baby is dying and you are chatting it up??????!!!!!"  Fortunately they were just thoughts because the next thing I know this man is getting in our car. This man, who looks like he just stepped out of an air-conditioned house, well dressed, not a drop of sweat on him and this infectious smile.  The reality is, is that he just walked many, many miles on a rocky, dirt path in 100 degree heat to get to the road and he looks fabulous.  Anyway, he greets us and in Creole I ask him how he is.  His answer completely throws me off.  It is not the normal reply I always hear and he says it with a smile and much conviction.  I ask our translator Pierre for an explanation.  It turns out that this sweet man is the Pastor from the church in Dotel ( I know right, God Rocks!).  His reply to my "How are you?"..."Tout bagay byen avek Jezi!", All is well with Jesus.

And so it was! We dropped off this beautiful man in Cabaret. We made it to the amazing campus of Mission Hope and checked in mom and baby and paid for their services. We were able to leave her with money for medicine and a ride back to her home. We asked that she come see us at the clinic in the morning before we leave just so we can check the baby one more time. She came. It was obvious this mom loves her baby dearly. I asked to hold Ivnaline and as soon as I touched her I smiled. She was cool, she was crying (just less than 24 hours before he couldn't even muster up a cry),mom said she was nursing. Indeed the Pastor with the infectious smile was correct.

ALL IS WELL WITH JESUS!      

TOUT BAGAY BYEN AVEK JEZI!

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